Special session on video hyperlinking: what to link and how to do that?

Video Hyperlinking

Video hyperlinking is growing interest in the multimedia retrieval community. In video hyperlinking the goal is to apply the concept of linking that we are used to in the text domain to videos: enable the user to browse from one video to another. The assumption is that video hyperlinking can help to explore large video repositories more adequately. Links are created based on an automatically derived, topical relationship between video segments. The question however is, how do we identify which video segments in these repositories are good candidates for linking? And also, if we have such candidates, how to make sure that the links to video targets are really interesting for a user? Five research groups presented their view on this today, at a special session at the International Conference on Multimedia Retrieval (ICMR2017) in Bucharest.

Hubs and false links

IMG_8581Chong-Wah Ngo from City University of Hong Kong…

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CLARIN/CLARIAH Collaboration on Automatic Transcription Chain for Digital Humanities

In the CLARIAH project, we are developing the Media Suite, an application that supports scholarly research using audiovisual media collections. In 2017 we will also be integrating tools that support Oral History research in the Media Suite. From 10 to 12 May 2017,  scholars and technology experts discussed the development of an automatic transcription chain for spoken word collections in the context of CLARIN, the European counterpart of CLARIAH, at a CLARIN-PLUS workshop in Arezzo. We observed that CLARIAH and CLARIN use a different but interesting complementary approach to the development of such a transcription chain that encourages further collaboration.

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Second CfP “Identifying and Linking Interesting Content in Large Audiovisual Repositories”

2nd CALL FOR ICMR2017 SPECIAL SESSION PAPERS

Identifying and Linking Interesting Content in Large Audiovisual Repositories

An emerging key challenge for multimedia information retrieval as technologies for component feature identification and standard ad hoc search mature is to develop mechanisms for richer content analysis and representations, and novel modes of exploration. For example, to enable users to create their own personal narratives by seamlessly exploring (multiple) large audiovisual repositories at the segment level, either by following established trails or creating new ones on the fly. A key research question in developing these new technologies and system is how we can automatically identify video content that viewers perceive to be interesting taking multiple modalities into account (visual, audio, text).

The ICMR2017 Special Session “Identifying and Linking Interesting Content in Large Audiovisual Repositories” is calling for papers (6 pages) presenting significant and innovative research focusing on mechanisms that help identifying significant elements within AV (or multimedia, in general) repositories and the creation of links between interesting video segments and other video segments (or multimedia content).

Papers should extend the state of the art by addressing new problems or proposing insightful solutions. We encourage submissions covering relevant perspectives in this area including:

  • Multi/mixed-media hyperlinking (audio-to-image, text-to-video)
  • Linking across audiovisual repositories (e.g., from professional to public)
  • Alignment of social media posts to video (segments)
  • Video-to-video search
  • Retrieval models that incorporate multimodal, segment-based retrieval and linking
  • Segment-level recommendation in videos
  • Video segmentation and summarization
  • Multimodal search (explicit combination of multimodal features)
  • Query generation from video
  • Video-to-text description
  • Content-driven, social-driven interestingness prediction
  • Object interestingness modeling and prediction
  • (User) evaluation of interestingness, hyperlinking or archive exploration systems
  • Use cases related to video hyperlinking or interestingness prediction in video
  • Interfaces for linked-video based storytelling.

For submission details see: http://icmr2017.ro/call-for-special-sessions-s2.php

On developing benchmark evaluations

The Multimedia COMMONS 2016 workshop (October 16 2016) –that will run as part of the ACM Multimedia conference in Amsterdam– will provide a forum for the community of current and potential users of the Multimedia Commons. This is a multi-institution collaboration initiative, that was launched last year to compute features, generate annotations, and develop analysis tools, principally focusing on the Yahoo Flickr Creative Commons 100 Million dataset (YFCC100M), which contains around 99.2 million images and nearly 800,000 videos from Flickr. The workshop aims to share novel research using the YFCC100M dataset, emphasizing approaches that were not possible with smaller or more restricted multimedia collections; ask new questions about the scalability, generalizability, and reproducibility of algorithms and methods; re-examine how we use data challenges and benchmarking tasks to catalyze research advances; and discuss priorities, methods, and plans for continuously expanding annotation efforts.

At the MMCommons workshop I will discuss the development of benchmark evaluations in the context of  a series of tasks focusing on audiovisual search emphasizing its ‘multimodal’ aspects, starting in 2006 with the workshop on ‘Searching Spontaneous Conversational Speech’ that led to tasks in CLEF and MediaEval (“Search and Hyperlinking”), and recently also TRECVid (“Video Hyperlinking”). The value and importance of Benchmark Evaluations is widely acknowledged. Benchmarks play a key role in many research projects. It takes time, a well-balanced team of domain specialists preferably with links to the user community and industry, and a strong involvement of the research community itself to establish a sound evaluation framework that includes (annotated) data sets, well-defined tasks that reflect the needs in the ‘real world’, a proper evaluation methodology, ground-truth, including a strategy for repetitive assessments, and last but not least, funding. Although the benefits of an evaluation framework are typically reviewed from a perspective of ‘research output’ –e.g., a scientific publication demonstrating an advance of a certain methodology– it is important to be aware of the value of the process of creating a benchmark itself: it increases significantly the understanding of the problem we want to address and as a consequence also the impact of the evaluation outcomes.

The focus of my talk will be on the process rather than on the results of these evaluations themselves, and will address cross-benchmark connections, and new benchmark paradigms, specifically the integration of benchmarking in industrial ‘living labs’ or Evaluation-as-a-Service (EaaS) initiatives that are becoming popular in some domains.

Audiovisual Linking: Scenarios, Approaches and Evaluation

The concept of (hyper)linking, well-known in the text domain, has been inspiring researchers and practitioners in the audiovisual domain since many years. On 30th of August 2016, I will talk about audiovisual linking at the 1st International Conference on Multimodal Media Data Analytics (MMDA2016) in The Hague, The Netherlands.

Various application scenarios can benefit from audiovisual linking. In recent years, we have been looking at recommendation and storytelling scenarios for video-to-video linking in the context of the Video Hyperlinking task in the MediaEval and TRECVid benchmark evaluation series, text-to-video linking to support fast access to broadcast archives in news production context, and audio-to-image linking in the context of visual radio. The latter relates to quite a long history of research projects on ‘linking the spoken word’ to related information sources in scenarios that aim for example to assist participants in meetings or to suggest slides during presentations.

I will present some of the approaches we experimented with the past years and zoom in on the process of setting up the video hyperlinking benchmark evaluations we have been running in MediaEval and TRECVid.

Video Hyperlinking Explained in 7 minutes (in Dutch)

On the 2nd of February I was invited to have a short introduction on video hyperlinking at iMMovator‘s Cross Media Café.  Here are the slides and there is also a video:

Call for Task Proposals MediaEval 2016

MediaEval is a benchmarking initiative dedicated to developing and evaluating new algorithms and technologies for multimedia retrieval, access and exploration. It offers tasks to the research community that are related to human and social aspects of multimedia. MediaEval emphasizes the ‘multi’ in multimedia and seeks tasks involving multiple modalities, e.g., audio, visual, textual, and/or contextual.

MediaEval is now calling for proposals for tasks to run in the 2016 benchmarking season. A proposal consists of a description of the motivation for the task and the challenges that task participants must address. It provides information on the data and evaluation methodology to be used. The proposal must also include a statement of how the task is related to MediaEval (i.e., its human or social component), and how it extends the state of the art in an area related to multimedia indexing, search or other technologies that support users in accessing information in multimedia collections.

For more detailed information about the content of the task proposal, please look here.

Tasks  are selected for inclusion at MediaEval on the basis of their feasibility, their match with the topical focus of MediaEval, and also according to the outcome of a survey circulated to the wider multimedia research community.

Proposal Deadline: 8 January 2016

The MediaEval 2016 Workshop is scheduled for 20-21 October 2016 in the Netherlands (just after ACM Multimedia 2016).

For more information about MediaEval see http://multimediaeval.org